Which Artist (Living or Dead) Would You Most Like To Spend Time With?

For me, it would be Leonardo Da Vinci because of his insatiable curiosito (curiosity) and his extraordinary diversity.

He was Renaissance before renaissance was cool.

I have read and re-read Michael Gelb’s fascinating book How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Dayabout the myriad aspects of Da Vinci’s artistry.

Which Artist (Living or Dead) Would You Most Like To Spend Time With?

40 Responses to “Which Artist (Living or Dead) Would You Most Like To Spend Time With?”

  1. Rembrandt. His painting of the prodigal son is one of my favorites. I LOVED Heni Nowen’s book on the Return of the Prodigal Son that paralleled the journey of the prodigal son with Rembrandt’s own life, artistry, and faith in God. t
    Tim Schraeder´s last blog post ..APPreciation

  2. Randy I love Gelb’s book. Inspirational.

    The artist I would most like to spend time with (present blog author aside) would have to be Walter Russell. Listen to this from the book The Man Who Tapped the Secrets of the Universe by Glenn Clark:

    “Most sculptors make the mistake,” he said, “of thinking of eyes as form and they therefore make them as spherical surfaces. Eyes are not forms, they are transparent, and what one really sees is the light of the soul in them — and that is what I try to give them. Until a sculptor is able to see the soul through the eyes his portrait is merely a portrait of flesh and blood.

    His work and life are a testament of a pure genius. Born into extreme poverty in 1871 he was forced to leave school at the age of eight (after just a couple of years of schooling). He went on to become a n accomplished musician, illustrator, portrait painter, architectural designer, sculptor, extremely successful and wealthy businessman, advisor to the President of IBM and other businesses, a motivational speaker, champion figure skater, natural scientist, philosopher and the author of scientific work used in mainstream chemistry.

    His sculptures are simply magnificent and what he had to teach about the unity with God would be a joy to listen to.

    • @James Cohen, Wow! Just simply wow!!

      “Most sculptors make the mistake,” he said, “of thinking of eyes as form and they therefore make them as spherical surfaces. Eyes are not forms, they are transparent, and what one really sees is the light of the soul in them — and that is what I try to give them. Until a sculptor is able to see the soul through the eyes his portrait is merely a portrait of flesh and blood.

      Thanks, James. You provide me so much thrilling research.
      Randy´s last blog post ..Undoing The Doing

  3. gah.
    Do we have to pick just one? For me, it’d have to be a songwriter, but I’m not sure which. Ok ok. I’m going to go with Leonard Cohen (wrote the famous “Hallelujah”)…

    Which reminds me: Randy, I want a songwriting mentor. Bad. Do you know where I can find one?
    mandythompson´s last blog post ..Pick Ones-

  4. Tim, I love that Nouwen book. So much so, that I have the Prodigal Son painting as my wallpaper on my phone and look for Rembrandt in any art museum I step into.

    If I didn’t think about it, my gut reaction would be Van Gogh. I feel like I’m right there in his paintings. Like they are alive and constantly moving. I am also drawn to the unhindered passion in his works/life, his lifelong desire for community, and I must admit, I’m a tad bit drawn to (or, better yet, intrigued by) the darkness vs. light struggle that eventually drove him insane and killed him. I would love to live my life with his passion, yet keeping both ears and maintaining my sanity.

  5. Mine would be Jim Morrison formerly of the Doors. I would like to ask him, “What were you thinking?” Genius gone awry.

  6. Yes please!!! I’m hoping to make a Pre-cREate trip to Nashville (my best friend lives there)… Maybe we can work something out.
    mandythompson´s last blog post ..Pick Ones-

  7. As a photographer, I would go with Herb Ritts.

    This may sound strange, but the man knew how to ‘sculpt’ with light. For an example of what I am talking about, look at this image of Sean Connery:

    http://www.areaofdesign.com/americanicons/ritts/010.jpg

    In addition to that, there was a simplicity about his photographs. Here’s another. This is one of Johnny Depp:

    http://www.vanityfair.com/images/culture/2009/07/johnny-depp-0907-ps01.jpg

    So in looking at his work, it was always more about vision than gear, setups or location. It would just be great to kind of get into what he thinks about when coming up with a concept for an image.
    Jay´s last blog post ..Catalyst 2010

  8. I don’t think I could pick just one. And based on what I’m reading in the comments, my list keeps getting longer.

    As an aside – I had the opportunity to visit the Getty museum in LA this summer. They had a Da Vinci exhibit that included someone dressed as the master interacting with the visitors. The great thing about it was his interaction with the kids. Before he would let them take a picture, they must ask him a question and allow him to answer completely. The kids asked great questions and I learned so much just sitting there listening. I don’t know if they are still doing this, but if you have the opportunity I highly recommend a visit.
    Michelle´s last blog post ..Friday Mish Mash

  9. Will do! Thanks, Randy
    mandythompson´s last blog post ..Pick Ones-

  10. I’d choose Da Vinci too…I want to sit and watch him work in his notebooks!

  11. you would think i’d probably pick a musician or a songwriter, but i’m going to throw you a curve ball.

    i would want to have a serious conversation with Alfred Hitchcock. just understanding the ways he chose to shoot and depict things would be a beautiful moment for me. i would also like to discuss themes of faith and redemption in his movies. and for the final two questions i would ask him would be: how did he made “Rope” look like a single camera shot? what inspired him to make my favorite film of his, “The Trouble With Harry”?
    Chuck Harris´s last blog post ..I want to…

  12. I think I’d pick Vermeer. I could sit and stare at his paintings all day, particularly this one.
    http://www.essentialvermeer.com/catalogue/girl_interrupted_in_her_music.html
    I don’t know why, but I feel a connection to her.

    I’d also like to know what he thought of Colin Firth’s portrayal of him. :)

  13. Walt Disney. He loved & thus animated stories where good triumphs over evil and truth exposes lies. Next would be Beatrix Potter who saw humor and truth in God’s creation and defied traditional womanly roles & pursued her dreams. Both gave our childhood’s so much magic. I’m still intrigued by their magic today at age 49.

  14. I want to write a worship song… with David Gilmour. O Ye uh.

  15. Goodness. So hard to pick. I think I’d have to pick one per medium. Here are a few:

    Painter: Picasso. Maybe a little trite, but since nobody else went with him, why not? His work was so diverse, and while the cubism stuff he did was interesting, I appreciate more of his earlier work. He really was a master and go tired with being so good (and realistic) that he was “forced” to delve into the more abstract. What an interesting conversation that would be! Plus, he was Spanish, and I could (awkwardly) talk to him in his native tongue.

    Writer: Maybe Hemingway?

    Photographer: Ansel Adams.

    Cartoonist: Jim Davis. (Creator of Garfield, of course)
    Jeff Goins´s last blog post ..My 10 Commandments for Short-Term Mission Trips

  16. Gosh, and music, I forgot music (how COULD I?!)…

    Jimmy Page (no question)
    Jeff Goins´s last blog post ..My 10 Commandments for Short-Term Mission Trips

  17. I would have preferred to watch him sculpt. His sculptures are amazing. In Florence, my friends and I stared at the David for an entire afternoon… no exaggeration.
    Jeff Goins´s last blog post ..My 10 Commandments for Short-Term Mission Trips

  18. da Vinci, to be sure, but as much for his science and mechanical invention. He was a great problem solver…asking questions that no one else was asking. He wanted to make water run uphill to get it from the source to hilltop communities. No one cared to worry about that problem.
    Just watching him design models (many of which he never built, but were later found to work exactly as he he had imagined.)
    Just following his curiosity around for a day would have been thrilling and inspiring.
    AND, I want Leonardo (a left-handed fellow, as I am) to teach me to write backwards.
    [P.S. Read Gelb’s book “Innovate Like Edison…”, too.]

    Second choice: Gordon MacKenzie (RIP) author of “Orbiting the Giant Hairball.” We had a brief email friendship before he died. A rule breaker, artist, designer, thinker of new thoughts. He left us too soon.
    McNair Wilson´s last blog post ..• priorities on a pulley

  19. D’oh! Yes, Michelangelo. :)

    My brain wasn’t screwed on right. Can you edit that comment to make me not look like a moron?
    Jeff Goins´s last blog post ..Messing Up on Your Mission Trip

  20. Preferably one who spoke English and wasn’t too insane.

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